Chrome Browser SSL Ending Support For Symantec Thawte Verisign Equifax GeoTrust RapidSSL

Well that’s a big deal.

https://security.googleblog.com/2018/03/distrust-of-symantec-pki-immediate.html

If you are running a Symantec certificate issued before June 1, 2016, and you do not replace the certificate, come April 17th, your site will be regarded as unsafe. The browser will display a big nasty warning that “Your connection is not secure” and most would-be visitors will be long gone.

Failure to replace your certificates will result in site breakage in upcoming versions of major browsers, including Chrome.

If you want to test your site https://www.google.com/chrome/browser/canary.html

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Is there a Free Antivirus Program I can use? NO!

Next time you find something fishy going on with your computer. You probably think “Is there a free antivirus program I can use?”

In this (very serious) game, you get what you deserve http://threatpost.com/a-new-spin-on-rogue-antivirus/107846

Pay for one of these reputable products instead. Please!

http://www.f-secure.com/
http://www.kaspersky.com/

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New Threats

Sites that come under the spell of Darkleech redirect certain visitors to malicious websites that host attack code spawned by the notorious Blackhole exploit kit. The fee-based package available in underground forums makes it easy for novices to exploit vulnerabilities in browsers and browser plug-ins. Web visitors who haven’t installed updates patching those flaws get silently infected with a variety of dangerous malware titles. Among the malware that Darkleech pushes is a “Nymaim” piece of ransomware that demands a $300 payment to unlock encrypted files from a victim’s machine.

http://arstechnica.com/security/2012/11/mushrooming-growth-of-ransomware-extorts-5-million-a-year/

Malware that disables computers and demands that hefty cash payments be paid to purported law-enforcement agencies before the machines are restored is extorting as much as $5 million from end-user victims, researchers said.

The estimate, contained in a report published on Thursday by researchers from antivirus provider Symantec, is being fueled by the mushrooming growth of so-called ransomware. Once infected, computers become unusable and often display logos of local law-enforcement agencies, along with warnings that the user has violated statutes involving child pornography or other serious offenses. The warnings then offer to unlock the computers if users pay a fine as high as $200 within 72 hours.

“A lot of individuals do pay up, either because they believe the messages or because they realize it is a scam but still want to restore access to their computer,” “Unfortunately, even if a person does pay up, the fraudsters often do not restore functionality.

http://arstechnica.com/security/2013/07/darkleech-infects-40k-apache-site-addresses/


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